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Voices From Chornobyl

this is for thousands of years

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History

Many many thanks

There are few ways to thank everyone for the incredible experience we had at the Hollywood Fringe Festival. Producing

Kendra Chell, Kappa Victoria Wood & Brett Colbeth

and cultivating an audience for this show proved to be a team effort, and I want to thank everyone in the program below, plus the following participants: Jennifer Jejay of I Heart Hamas, Todd Blakesley & Dulce Maria Solis of Chela, Meghan McCauley of Spring Awakening, Monica Martin from ArtWorks, Anton Ray of Warrior Poet and Matt Quinn of Theater Asylum.

We were one of the plays awarded a Best of the Fringe, which includes an offer for extension. Comment below to subscribe to our mailing list or email cindy@cindymariejenkins.com .

Many thanks as well to Theatre Unleashed, who nominated us for their Unleashed Award!

Voices From Chornobyl jr.

Written by Cindy Marie Jenkins | Directed by Aaron Kozak

Shelley Delayne & Kappa Victoria Wood

Inspired by the book of interviews

Voices From Chernobyl by Svetlana Alexievich

Produced by special arrangement with the publisher

Featuring Kendra Chell, Brett Colbeth*, Shelley Delayne, Jesse Sharp* & Kappa Victoria Wood

Stage Managers Jessica Farley & Deanna Fleysher

Sound Designer Corwin Evans

Co-Producer Rachel Stoll | Social Media Jennifer Brooks

Dramaturg Karen Jean Martinson | Graphics Caroline Sharp

ensemble

Kendra Chell

KENDRA CHELL (Irina | June 25 & 26) was recently nominated for an LA Weekly Award for her role in the Open Fist Theatre production of The Illusion. She holds a B.A. in Theatre Arts from San Francisco State University and has studied with LAMDA, Berkeley Rep and UCB. She has worked with American Conservatory Theatre, The San Francisco Mime Troupe, The Antaeus Company and Kingsmen Shakespeare. Past credits include Arcadia, La Ronde, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Picasso at the Lapin Agile, A Lie of the Mind, James Joyce’s THE DEAD and The Rover. Film and TV credits include “The Selling,” “Against the Grain,” “Venice By The Sea,” “Close So Far” and “Mary Olsen” webisodes. Kendra is a proud member of the A2 Ensemble, Antaeus’ Academy Company. http://kendrachell.com/

BRETT COLBETH (Vasily June 11, 19, 25 & 26) is thrilled to be a part of VFC Jr.!  Recent L.A. theatre credits include Dakin Matthews’ The Capulets and The Montagues at Andak Stage CompanyLast Fling at Circus Theatricals, and Bart DeLorenzo’s critically acclaimed King Lear at Antaeus Theatre Company.  Brett was most recently seen in Antaeus’ workshop production of Love’s Labour’s Lost directed by Darin Anthony.  Brett is a member of A2 (Antaeus’ Academy Company) as well as Shakespeare and Friends.  He is a proud member of Actors’ Equity Association.  Much love to his peers, Cindy Jenkins, and wonderful family- Dad, Mom and Jackie.  Enjoy the show!

Shelley Delayne

SHELLEY DELAYNE (Irina | June 11, 18 & 19) was in the ensemble of a Hollywood Fringe Festival show last year (The Girl Who Would Be King) which received a nomination for an LA Weekly Theatre Award and is excited to be back at the Fringe as part of a completely different kind of show. Other non-Fringe plays in Los Angeles include: Laundry & Bourbon, Sylvia, Salome, Jake’s Women, and On the Verge.

Jesse Sharp

JESSE SHARP (Vasily June 18) is a recent graduate of the MFA acting program at UC Irvine. Recent credits include: Into The Woods (Baker) Two Gentleman of Verona (Valentine) and the world premier musical Great Expectations at the Tony Award Winning Utah Shakespeare Festival. Tours include Grease (Vince Fontaine) and the fantastic kids show Henry and Mudge with Theatreworks USA. TV/Film credits include “General Hospital,” “The Man Show,” “Not Another Teen Movie” as well as several indies & webseries. He is excited to be making his Fringe debut! www.JesseSharp.net

Kappa Victoria Wood

KAPPA VICTORIA WOOD (Katya) is honored to return to Voices From Chornobyl, which has eerily become more relevant than ever. Some of Kappa’s previous work includes ‘Corie’ in Barefoot in the Park, ‘Laura’ in The Glass Menagerie, ‘Gilmer’ in Godspell and ‘Gabby’ in The Petrified Forest. Kappa would like to thank her fiancé Michael Curran for his love and support and you for supporting live theater!

additional ensemble

BRAD BEACOM |CAROLYN BLAIS | DREW DOYLE | ENCI | AARON LYONS* | SHAWN MACAULAY* | ROBERT NEGRON* | CHANNING SARGENT | BRIAN SPARROW | KATIE SWEENEY | NICOL ZANZARELLA-GIACALONE*

*denotes member of Actors’ Equity Association, the professional union of actor and stage managers

production team

JENNIFER BROOKS (Social Media) has been working on and off (mostly off) the stage for 15+ years.  She holds a BA from San Francisco State, where she was the Student President of the Theatre Department. For over five years, she worked with L.A. Theatre Works, the premier radio theatre company in the country, where she was in charge of casting 10+ shows a year with top name actors of stage and screen for their radio show on NPR.  She has also worked with California Shakespeare Theatre, Campo Santo and Malibu Theatre Company.  She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two cats.

CORWIN EVANS (Sound Designer) is a freelance designer of sound, projections and integrated experiences. He’s worked in the LA area for five years, and chances are pretty darn good he’s going to see you at some events this Fringe. He’s excited at the prospect of a prodigious amount of high-fives. Corwin is on a mission to work in almost every one of the 300+ theaters in LA. In the meantime, he enjoys the roller coaster ride of cat ownership, writes original music for theatre and/or fun, pretends to be a comedy writer on his lunch hour and works as a Concierge for Center Theatre Group. www.CorwinEvans.com/ | www.facebook.com/corwin0 | www.twitter.com/corwinevans | www.latensemble.com/

Jessica Farley

JESSICA FARLEY (Stage Manager) is fantastic and has been working in theatre and short films for over 15 years. She trained at the George Washington University and with instructors from the Shakespeare Theatre Company. Jessica is a participant in the Global Theatre Project and founding member of the Tripod Actors Collective. She’s thrilled to be working on VOICES FROM CHORNOBYL as she has worked on projects for humanitarian causes throughout the world.  Jessica loves people and is especially excited to be involved in the Hollywood Fringe and would like to give a shout to her uncle Marc Spiegel, storyteller extraordinaire, who wrote and performed The Grubrag’s Ballad for the Capitol Fringe Festival in D.C. in 2010 and will again be performing 2011. Jessica is passionate about human rights and has worked with Amnesty international for about 15 years and is a coordinator for their Young Professionals network and the State Death Penalty Abolition Coordinator for Southern California, for which she often speaks publicly and engages in community outreach. Her human rights and community-building work informs her artistic pieces, which all stem from a deep dedication to the creation of meaning and the True, the Beautiful and the Good.

Deanna Fleysher

DEANNA FLEYSHER (Stage Manager) is a performer, teacher and director just arrived from NYC. She is very excited to be working on this project!

Cindy Marie Jenkins

CINDY MARIE JENKINS (Playwright & Outreach) is a Storyteller based in Los Angeles. She is obsessed with outreach & community-building. In 2008, Cindy gave a Key Note Speech at “Remember Chernobyl,” an Annual Conference for UK & Irish Chernobyl Charities.  April 2011 presentations included Stockton England and 3 locations in Los Angeles. In June the ensemble travels to San Diego to present the piece in conjunction with Inner Mission Productions. June also brings the premiere of her ten-minute play Dragon Compact as part of Moving Arts’ CAR PLAYS, presented at the RADAR LA International Theatre Festival, leading up to the TCG Conference. She is also running around the Directors Lab West June 11-18th, as a member  of the Steering Committee. In March she returned to The Indy Convergence, where she workshopped MYTHistory Part .5 (www.Twitter.com/MYTHistories), a transmedia piece on perception. Previous community art installations/interactions were shown at the 1st Annual Atwater Art Walk, Summer Nights on the Boulevard, The Barnsdall Gallery, The Courtyard Gallery, the Silver Lake Jubilee (2010 & 2011) and the Children’s Festival of the Arts in Hollywood. She regularly contributes to LA Stage Times, Atwater Village Now, The Inspired Classroom, Bitter Lemons & LAFPI. www.CindyMarieJenkins.com http://www.Twitter.com/cindymariej

Aaron Kozak

AARON KOZAK (Director) has been doing theater for 20 years, debuting in “Camelot” in 1990 at the Lamplight Theatre in Nacogdoches, Texas. Since then, he’s performed in over forty plays, 7 feature films, and countless shorts. He wrote, produced, directed, edited and starred in”The Show Businessman,” which was selected as an official finalist of the 2010 Las Vegas Film Festival. His directing/editing credits include Ebay’s Regifting Campaign with Andy Richter, Revelle Studios’ “Star Mashers,” MTV’s “True Life,” “The Night Audit,” “Basketball Shorts,” “The Chinnedy’s,” and “Savages.” As a playwright, he was privileged to be affiliated with the International Fringe circuit. His play “Goodbye, Love. Goodbye, Joy. Hello, Travis McElroy.” was performed at the Capital Fringe Festival in Washington, DC; and his play THE BIRTHDAY BOYS will be making its New York debut in late 2011Karen Jean Martinson/early 2012.

KAREN JEAN MARTINSON (Dramaturg) is a scholar, dramaturg, director, and sometimes puppeteer who freelances throughout Los AngelesMartinson was awarded her Ph.D. in Theatre History, Literature, and Theory from the University of Minnesota in 2008. Through her academic and artistic work, she explores issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality within US American consumer culture. http://www.MissKarenJean.com

Caroline Sharp

CAROLINE SHARP (Graphics & Social Media) is proud to be a part of this tremendous production. A graduate of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts with a BFA in Drama, Caroline has studied with the renowned Atlantic Theater Company in both New York and Los Angeles. Her work includes roles in The Importance of Being Earnest, Les Liaisons Dangereuses, An Enemy of The People, & the recent new musical, Group which also has performances at the Hollywood Fringe. www.CarolineSharp.net

RACHEL STOLL (Producer) is happy to be producing in the Hollywood Fringe Festival again this year. She is awesome. Special thx to Cindy Marie Jenkins and the rest of the VFC team, to my mother for supporting our April production and to Jon Armstrong for keeping me sane. www.RachelStoll.Com | www.Twitter.com/RachelStoll

donors

Executive Producer | $200 | Barbara Blankenship Advocate | $100 | Shelley Delayne | Aaron Lyons | Sponsor | $50-99 | Kelly Banusciewitz of Beans Boutique | Alex Bruno | Hallie Faben

Patron | $0-49 | Cassandra Davis | Alicia Gibbs | Bari Hochwald | Eugene Hutchins | Mike Khachanov | Christopher Lutz | Lauren Maddox | Karen Jean Martinson | Robert Negron | Pamela Noles | Stephen Gabriel Pallo | Sherri Pender | Leonora & Scott Pitts | Steven Scott | Michael Seel | Marta Segura | Marc Stigler | Alyson Unger | Janet Whitty | Bethanee Wilgocki | David Wisehart

special thanks

Abraham Tetenbaum, Bitter Lemons, Cynthia Brickman, Kumbi Butler of Heartbeat House, Joe Luis Cedillo & Company of Strangers, Rhianon Elan, Tracy Eliot, Alexandra Goodman, Dan Jenkins, Meghan McCauley, Pamela Noles, Lee Osteen II, Kat Primeau, Patty J. Robinson, Michael Seel, Richard Tatum & so many more.

much gratitude to the entire Fringe Staff

Jon Armstrong, Ezra Buzzington, Alexa Hanhram, Ben Hill, Nick Hill, Stacy Jones, Kanchan Mattoo, Meghan McCauley, David McKeever, Elizabeth Steele, Abbie Wagoner and Gavin Worth

Our Fringe Correspondent Interview

Stacy Jones, Publicity Director for the Fringe,  and her Correspondents Team are accomplishing an amazing task: seeing lots of shows and filming short interviews with the creators directly afterwards. Our show is the second interview in this clip!

The Cast Responds: Kappa Victoria Wood

We asked the ensemble if they could say a few words on why they want to be involved with this awareness project. First up is Kappa Victoria Wood, who has played Katya in both the adult and now the interactive children’s show.

“History had repeated itself”

Kappa rehearsing Katya (say that 10x fast)

Here’s my response to the material and why I keep subjecting myself to (stories about) radiation:

My character, Katya, was 9-year-old when the accident happened.  I was also 9, but on the other end of the world in my safe little suburban neighborhood and have no recollection of ever having heard of it.  Even throughout my education, I can’t recall ever studying about Chornobyl, save for a sidebar in a textbook, if that.

Fast-forward to five years ago when Voices From Chornobyl was first staged, where I learned of the weighty, compelling stories of those who were made to suffer and even those still living with the consequences of the intense radiation exposure.  How had I never heard of this?

It seemed that there was not only the struggle of the physical effects, but a social struggle of a people who were so proud of their homeland under a government that essentially let them down.  The VFC material in its various stagings over the past five years has always walked the fine line of presenting some rather horrific stories without preaching for or against nuclear power.

When I would share with people the nature of the material, I felt the need to explain that this is an on-going story.  As Katya’s father, Vasily, says, “This is for thousands of years.”  Then the Fukushima incident happened.  While the circumstances were radically different, the danger of radiation is still the same.  What really struck a chord with me is how so much of the language used by reporters, the technical terms, the governmental statements, even 25 years after the Chornobyl accident, all sounded the same.  History had repeated itself and suddenly, I didn’t have to justify why remembering Chornobyl was significant.

My hope is that in addition to educating others, Voices From Chornobyl serves as a reminder that even the largest-scale events are about individual people who have their own hopes, thoughts, dreams, perspectives and, well, voices.

Art from Chornobyl

Sunday: Outreach at the Silver Lake Jubilee

We have some very exciting opportunities thanks to the tireless efforts of the Hollywood Fringe Festival staff.

The first awesome outreach event specific to Fringe is our appearance at The Silver Lake Jubilee on

Sunday, May 22nd

10:00-10:40 a.m.

Santa Monica Stage

$5 donation for entry

“We’re a fun, family, art, music, theatre, comedy, literature and earth-lovin’ festival.” Read their press release here.

What are we doing there?

In the spirit of our Fringe show, we are running

interactive theatre games

to investigate and explore our world.

Suitable & adjustable for all ages

Run by our special guest Rhianon Gutierrez!

Rhianon Gutierrez is an award-winning filmmaker, writer, activist, and public speaker. Rhianon earned her BFA in Film Production from Chapman University, where she made her acclaimed documentary, When I’m Not Alone. Her current film, TRANSIENTS, is a short drama explores art, disability rights, and the one-time connections that transform our lives. A tireless advocate for people with disabilities, Rhianon has been involved with media, outreach, advocacy, and/or grassroots organizing with various organizations that focus on people with disabilities and hearing loss.


Audience will choose from the following issues

& explore solutions:

poverty

education

health care

disability

deaf/hard of hearing issues

environmental issues

Then stay for Coeurage Theatre Company‘s new musical selection, Jon Armstrong performs magic & Cynthia Brinkman spills the beans about her first kiss – all sneak peeks of Hollywood Fringe Festival shows!

Full program 10-11a.m.

Food trucks, community vendors and music the rest of the day!

Fringe Family and Voices from Chornobyl, Jr.

If you haven’t already checked out the page about the Hollywood Fringe Festival on the top of the page, you should. We are presenting Voices from Chornobyl, Jr as part of their Fringe Family program this year. Essentially, we have developed an interactive children’s piece to help spread awareness and education. The play was presented last month at the Atwater Village Public Library to great success, and both teachers and librarians gave us some wonderful feedback.

Katya was 9 when the accident at the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant changed her life. An interactive and educational story of a young girl struggling with her world, brought to you by the Awareness Team of Voices From Chornobyl.

Tickets are already on sale, and we are currently fundraising in order to make this piece happen to the best of its potential. We are slated to have four shows, with one preview the Saturday before the festival opens. More information is available on the ticketing page, includes dates and time (June 11, 18, 19, 25,26 at 1:00pm).

We will have an announcement later this week regarding the full cast and crew for the fringe production as well as more information about our preview at Silver Lake Jubilee!

Japan: A Reaction

I was one and a half years old when Chernobyl happened. I learned about it later on but everything was always in the past tense; Chernobyl was a cautionary tale, not a living breathing disaster. Only after becoming involved with Voices From Chornobyl did I truly realize the ongoing implications of what happened that day in 1986.

Like many people I stayed up late last Thursday evening watching the heartbreaking footage of the aftermath of both the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. At the first mention of the state of Japan’s three nuclear reactors in the area my stomach dropped. Even as I write this there are new developments, the situation is constantly changing, and no one can be certain what will happen next. While authorities are assuring the public nothing like Chernobyl or Three Mile Island is possible the parallels are hard to ignore. For me it’s somewhat surreal, after learning so much about Chernobyl – the events leading up to it, the immediate aftermath and the ongoing effects – to have an event happening in the modern day, that in many ways brings these elements into my daily life, was not something I was prepared for. I have to admit even after all the awareness we have been doing for VFC I never expected to be confronted with these realities in this way.

I don’t want to be reactionary, I think the major news stations do a good enough job on their own, and I don’t even mean this as a criticism of nuclear power per se, but the events of the past few days have made the topic of nuclear plants and radiation very real for me. But despite the fear of what might happen I think it’s important to point out the differences we have seen in the reaction to these ongoing events. Most evident is the amount of information available, in the age of the 24/7 news cycles and social media the global community is much more aware of what is happening than in the days after Chernobyl. Transparency is key to dealing with disasters and can truly impact the outcome in many ways. The early evacuation of those that live near the endangered reactors is a positive example of the difference between what is happening now in Japan and how the Former Soviet Union dealt with the events at Chernobyl.

The best test of course is time, to see how this is handled going forward and what the true aftermath might be. As I have learned from Chernobyl the effects of radiation go on long after all the foreign journalists have left and even after the major clean up is done. To quote a line from the play “this is for thousands of years”; for my part I’m hoping this will never be said of the events unfolding in Japan.

– Jane

Retro Post: When the Soviets admitted the disaster

This was posted on the original blog in 2007.

I am posting this because:

(a) I need a break from the next play I am writing

(b) I am going to develop the character of Stepanov further for the next Draft of Chronicle of the Future

(c) the bbc site is very extensive

1986: Soviets admit nuclear accident

The Soviet Union has acknowledged there has been an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. The report, from the official news agency, Tass, said there had been casualties but gave no details of numbers. It said aid was being sent to the injured.

The report said that one of the reactors had been damaged in the accident, but gave no further details beyond saying that measures were being taken to “eliminate the consequences of the accident”. It also claimed the accident was the first at a Soviet power station.

The report was the first confirmation of a major nuclear catastrophe since monitoring stations in Sweden, Finland and Norway began reporting sudden high discharges of radioactivity in the atmosphere two days ago.

Meltdown

The accident is believed to be the most serious in the history of nuclear power, worse even than that at the Three-Mile Island power station in the United States in 1979, when there was some release of radioactivity but nobody was injured.

The Chernobyl nuclear power plant, just north of Kiev, consists of four nuclear reactors, known as light-water cooled, graphite-moderated reactors – a type hardly used outside the Soviet Union.

Nuclear experts say the levels of radioactivity recorded indicate that the nuclear core of the damaged reactor may have melted down.

Full-scale alert

The number of casualties, both immediately and in the future, from radiation sickness, is expected to be high, although the exact number may never be known. It is not believed, however, that there is any risk to the health of anyone outside the Soviet Union.

The discharge of radioactivity was so great that by the time the fallout reached Sweden, 1,000 miles away, it was still powerful enough to register twice the natural level of radioactivity in the atmosphere.

The sudden jump in radioactivity levels was enough to prompt a full-scale alert in Sweden, which initially believed the accident had happened at its own nuclear power station, on the Baltic coast. The evacuation of 600 workers had been ordered before experts realised that the source of the radioactivity must have been within the Soviet Union.

Timeline of a Disaster – The Response

April 27th – The evacuation of Pripyat begins. Residents are told to only being essentials as the evacuation will be temporary – they are told they will be able to return in three days. No announcement is made to the global community or within the greater Soviet Union.

________________________________________________________

ANNA

There was no sign.

Sometimes, your palm itches and you know to get ready. But today, no signs.

________________________________________________________

April 28th – Workers at Forsmark Nuclear Power plant in Sweden notice radioactive particles on their clothing, testing revealed that the particles were not from the Swedish plant. This was the first sign of a serious nuclear problem in the Soviet Union.

– Later that day the first reports out of the Soviet Union arrive. They state there has been an accident at the Chernobyl Power Plant and there are casualties. A committee is formed to investigate.

April 29th – The accident is reported in German news.

________________________________________________________

VASILY

It look less than a week for Chornobyl to become a problem for the entire world.

________________________________________________________

May 5th – Evacuations conclude for the 30-km zone around Chernobyl. 130,000 people have been evacuated over this 10 day period.

– Firefighters are finally successful in putting out the remaining fires. This brings a reduction in the amount of radiation being released.

May 8th – Workers conclude the work of pumping out radioactive water from the drain pool in the reactor. Over the course of this operation they removed 20,000 metric tons of highly radioactive water. Two of the three men involved later died of radiation sickness.

________________________________________________________

A SOLITARY HUMAN VOICE

The skin on his arms and legs began to crack. Covered in blisters. When he turns his head, clumps of hair remain on his pillow. I try to joke about it. “It’s handy, you won’t have to carry a comb.”

________________________________________________________

May 23rd – A government committee orders that iodine be distributed to those who may have been exposed. This late after exposure, however, iodine treatments are completely ineffective as any radiation would have already accumulated in the thyroid glands.

________________________________________________________

VASILY

We must immediately give prophylactic iodine treatment to the population and move out everyone living close to the station.

STEPANOV

Had a phone call. From the Kremlin. From Gorbachev. Something about not starting a panic in Belarussia. The West is making too much of it already.

________________________________________________________

November 15th – A concrete ‘sarcophagus’ is created to enclose the still radioactive reactor.

December 22nd – The Soviet government announces that the sarcophagus now enclosing the reactor was only designed for a lifespan of 20 – 30 years.

Timeline of a Disaster – The Beginning

April 26th, 1986

1:23 am – A test of the cooling systems in Unit 4 of the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine begins.

1:23:40am – An emergency shut down of the reactor is initiated. Like many elements of the Chornobyl disaster the details of this are not know, there are numerous competing theories of why the shut down was activated.

_________________________________________________________

KATYA

You’re writing a book, but so far no book has helped, explained it to me. No more than the theater or the movies. I figure it out without them. By myself. -Voices from Chornobyl, Cindy Marie Jenkins

_________________________________________________________

1:23:44am – The reactor in Unit 4 experiences a massive power spike, the core overheats, and seconds later the initial explosion occurs.

1:24am – A second, more powerful explosion occurs, resulting from a nuclear excursion. This explosion destroys the roof of the building, exposing the core to the atmosphere. According to witnesses burning lumps of material and sparks shot into the air above the reactor. Some of these sparks ignited a graphite fire when they came into contact with the roof of the machine hall.

_________________________________________________________

ANNA

People took their small children outside, lifted them up and said, “Look, how beautiful! Don’t forget this.” We stood in that horrible black smoke.

A SOLITARY HUMAN VOICE

Flames Covered the whole sky.

ANNA

We did not know that Death could be so beautiful.

_________________________________________________________

1:28am – Firefighters begin to respond. First on the scene was a Chornobyl Power Station firefighter brigade, these men were under the command of Lieutenant Volodymyr Pravik (who later died on May 9th, 1986 of radiation poisoning). They were not made aware of the dangers of the situation or notified which parts of the power plant were affected.

_________________________________________________________

A SOLITARY HUMAN VOICE

They went off to the fire without their protective gear, just in their shirt sleeves. They were summoned as if to a normal fire.

_________________________________________________________

2am – The largest fire, burning on the roof of the reactor is brought under control by as many as 100 firefighters from Pripyat and Kiev. When questioned later, before their deaths, these firefighters described radiation as “tasting like metal” and a feeling of pins and needles all over their faces.

5am – Majority of the fire has been extinguished. However, the graphite fire is still burning causing the dispersion of radionuclides into the atmosphere.

By the evening of April 26th two people have died from radiation sickness and 52  have already been hospitalized. A government committee is finally formed to investigate the incident. No inhabitants of nearby towns, such as Pripyat, are evacuated despite the committees extensive evidence showing high levels of radiation.

_________________________________________________________

KATYA

We’re all going through this alone, and we don’t know what to do. I cannot comprehend it with my mind. My grandmother said she had no childhood. She had the war. Their childhood is the war and mine is Chornobyl.

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